Rise up! ‘Drawn to Change’ illustrates Canadian labour’s stories and struggles

Drawn to Change’ is both a moving historical account and an unabashed call to arms.

“Indeed, much of what we learn about history in school, at the movies or on the History channel revolved around the lives of individuals with the most money and power in society, such as monarchs, capitalists, and politicians. But workers’ lives matter too; without our labour, society would cease to function. We are important agents of social transformation, and our power is magnified when we work together.”

So begins the Graphic History Collective’s new collection Drawn to Change: Graphic Histories of Working Class Struggle.

Drawn to Change has over 20 contributors with nine comics portraying different moments in Canadian labour. From 19th-century Knights of Labour to the contemporary Live-in Caregiver Program, this collection of chronological graphic histories is a feat of visual expression and storytelling and an incredible resource for Canadian labour history.

Read the full review on rabble.ca.

Women of Labour and the Arts: Talking With the 2014 Min Sook Lee Award Winners

Winter 2015

People don’t understand,” says musician, singer/songwriter and community activist Faith Nolan. “They think labour is two old white guys hammering a nail who want more money and to work less. They don’t see that those two old white guys, along with white women and brown and black and yellow women and men, are doing this labour to have the right to a life. People have a disconnect in this sense.”

Read the full feature on the Our Times Magazine website.

Writing Pictures, Drawing Stories: A Caregiver Comic Book

August 2014

What does it mean to care for another person’s child when your own is far away? What does it mean to exist in a country only as long as you are employed by citizens of that state? What is it called when you work 24 hours a day caring for a family that becomes your family, because you live with your employer?

According to two Toronto artists, Althea Balmes and Jo SiMalaya Alcampo, it is called a labour of
love. The Live-in Caregiver Program (LCP), one visa option under Canada’s Temporary Foreign Worker
Program, is where the politics of labour meet the politics of love.

Balmes and Alcampo are the creators of LCP Comics, and the project Kwentong Bayan: Labour of Love.

Read the full feature on the Our Times Magazine website.